Brackstone, Carrie-Anne & Laura Bushell. Oi, Pikey: A Celebration of Cheap Living (2005).


Oi, Pikey

“2001 – 36 people attempt to sue McDonald’s after the famous coffee spilling lawsuit in th US. High Court Justice Richard Field said McDonald’s has no obligation to warn customers about the risk of scalding from a beverage that’s made from boiling water. Hard luck pikeys.”

This was a Christmas present purchased by my wife for me because on the back it says that it is for people who “take soaps from hotels.” At least she knows me well. Really, it is a comical book about living on the cheap in England (which becomes an ever harder task). It’s quite tongue in cheek and starts with a reclamation of the word Pikey. It usually refers to a gypsy or traveller, but Brackstone and Bushell want it to mean so much more. They say it should stand for those proud to value value and find liberty in that which is inexpensive. To be honest, though, it’s a fairly amusing book.

There are just random bits of law. The criminal law is treated with a short discussion of a recent ban on police using the word because it refered “to a particular type of criminal usually from the travelling community.” The authors conclude that a ban on “‘you’re,’ ‘under,’ and ‘arrest’ would have helped more pikeys (however they do note the financial advantages to jail time). They later tell us that the pikey child should hone his criminal skills when young, because that is when he is “out of reach of the long arm of the law.”

In addition to the reference above to the McDonald’s Case, they mention comedian Ken Dodd’s trial for tax evasion (he was acquitted). It also tells us that Johnny Vegas nearly had to sue for the ₤1 that he sold his wedding photos for to Viz magazine.

A few lawyers make the book. When tracing the etymology of the words the authors look twice to usage in Charles Dickens, who was at one point a law clerk. Jerry Springer is a pikey hero, who besides being a famous white trash spokesman is also a lawyer. Cherie Blair is a successful ebayer and a barrister. There is also a reference to Ghandi who studied law in England.

Probably the only real legal theme that runs through the book is that Pikeys should take advantage of the law and live on the dole as much as possible. This can be either through the redistributive power of the welfare state or through the redistributive power of tort claims. Margaret Thatcher makes the book as an enemy of the Pikey because she “made massive cutbacks to [Great Britains] infrastructure, paving the way for capitalism.” This in part damaged the welfare state which “was the linchpin of pikey living.” The pikey, in the author’s view, must be able to get as much out of the state as possible.

So, um . . . oi, pikey.

Carrie-Anne Brackstone
Laura Bushell

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One Response to Brackstone, Carrie-Anne & Laura Bushell. Oi, Pikey: A Celebration of Cheap Living (2005).

  1. Inspirational Wedding Speeches And Toasts

    Inspirational Wedding Speeches And Toasts

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